Mike Adams Reports the Boston Herald to the FBI for Recommending That Those who Oppose Vaccines Should Be Executed by Hanging

May 15, 2017 in News by Slad

 

Source: G. Edward Griffin’s Need To Know

Mike Adams, the owner of the Natural News website, is filing a complaint with the Boston FBI against the Boston Herald for publishing a violence-inciting editorial attributed to the Boston Herald. The editorial claims that vaccines don’t cause autism and that it ought to be a “hanging offense” for anyone who opposes this conventional theory, which they characterized as lying.  Mike Adams alleges that the Boston Herald staff engaged in criminal intimidation by calling for deadly violence against vaccine critics, including naturopaths, scientists, chiropractors and journalists.

Mike Adams, the owner of the Natural News website, is filing a complaint with the Boston FBI against the Boston Herald for publishing a violence-inciting editorial attributed to the Boston Herald. The editorial claims that vaccines don’t cause autism and that it ought to be a “hanging offense” for anyone who opposes this conventional theory, which they characterized as lying.  Mike Adams alleges that the Boston Herald staff engaged in criminal intimidation by calling for deadly violence against vaccine critics, including naturopaths, scientists, chiropractors and journalists.

The editorial was in reaction to the recent outbreak of 51 cases of measles in Minnesota, primarily among the Somali immigrant population.  The Somali population in Minnesota has about half the vaccination rate of the general population. This is because they have backed away from inoculating their children due to previous high autism rates, triple the number of the general population, discovered in 2008.  The CDC currently reports the autism rate at 1 in 68 children.  The mainstream media has failed to inform the public that the autism rate for Somali children living in Minnesota was 1 in 32 in 2010, with more severe disabilities reported than in other populations.  Some Somali parents credit their freedom from autism to the fact that they grew up in Somalia without vaccines.

Anti-vaccine groups are being blamed for the measles outbreak, because Dr. Andrew Wakefield and anti-vaccine groups informed the Somali community about the dangers of vaccines and their legal rights regarding vaccine exemptions.

Investigative reporter, Jefferey Jackson, has traced the authorship of the “hit piece” back to Rachelle Cohen and gives her contact information, as well as the Boston Herald’s contact information in this link.

Here is what Cohen wrote in the Boston Herald:

“…Skepticism about vaccines within Minnesota’s Somali community goes back a decade, the Post reported, after parents raised concern about possible higher rates of autism among their children (research later indicated that wasn’t the case).

“But it seems that was all the truthers needed to hear. When Somali parents sought answers to explain autism, anti-vaccine activists were delighted to fill in the information gap. The disgraced British doctor who once reported a link between vaccines and autism — which was deemed fraudulent and cost him his medical license — has met with families, the Post reported. Even amid this latest outbreak, anti-vaccine groups have fanned the flames, making it hard for public health officials and doctors to be heard above the noise.

“These are the facts: Vaccines don’t cause autism. Measles can kill. And lying to vulnerable people about the health and safety of their children ought to be a hanging offense.”

Contrary to what Cohen wrote, it is important to point out that measles outbreaks in the US are not serious or deadly, according to the CDC:

  • From January 1 to April 22, 2017, 61 people from 10 states (California, Florida, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Utah, and Washington) were reported to have measles.
  • In 2016, 70 people from 16 states were reported to have measles.
  • In 2015, 188 people from 24 states and the District of Columbia were reported to have measles.
  • In 2014, the United States experienced a record number of measles cases, with 667 cases from 27 states reported to CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD); this is the greatest number of cases since measles elimination was documented in the U.S. in 2000.

Measles are temporary, but autism is forever.

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